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Screening Unit
Screening Unit

General employment

General employment probity checks help employers decide if an individual will be a suitable employee or volunteer. These checks are role-specific and valid for three years but do not include a copy of the individual’s criminal conviction history that is assessed.

If you need a copy of the criminal conviction history, a national police check may be a better option.

Who needs a check?

There are no laws requiring people to have this type of check, but an organisation may want you to have one as a condition of working with them.

A general employment probity check may be needed for:

  • human resources roles
  • finance roles
  • administration/corporate roles
  • some correctional services roles.

If your work or volunteer role means you have a different check, such as for working in the disability sector or working with children, you don’t need to get a general employment probity check, too.

A general employment probity check is a risk assessment for someone doing a single, specific role. This means they aren’t suitable for people doing a variety of roles, for example, agency staff.

How to get a check

If you need criminal history documentation, you need a national police check.

Alternatively, organisations can start an application with the Screening Unit on behalf of an individual for a general employment probity check, which assesses a range of information.

If the Screening Unit assessment indicates someone may pose a risk, they will contact the individual for more information before finishing the assessment.

The Screening Unit emails the result to the organisation. A copy of the criminal history is not included.


Related information

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Last updated:[06 Jun 2019 7:58am]

Provided by:
SA Department for Human Services
URL:
https://screening.sa.gov.au/types-of-check/general-employment
Last Updated:
05 Jul 2018
Printed on:
12 Nov 2019
The Screening Unit website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence. © Copyright 2016